Cherry Street, Werribee

The Cherry Street level crossing is located east of Werribee Station, and is used by 20,000 vehicles daily. This is a key connection point for the area, linking residents with the local city centre and Princes Freeway. Up to 140 trains travel through the Cherry Street level crossing each weekday.

Removing this crossing will improve safety, provide more reliable travel times and reduce congestion. It will ease travel and improve safety when getting around Melbourne’s west.

The final design

The level crossing will be removed by building a road bridge over the rail line, extending Tarneit Road to Princes Highway via the irrigation channel next to Wyndham City Council offices.

People travelling to and from Princes Freeway will have a faster journey using this new direct link.

At Cherry Street, we will build a wide, well-lit underpass for pedestrians and cyclists to safely cross the rail line and gain easy access to the Watton Street shopping precinct, before closing the existing crossing to road traffic.

Works are expected to start in early 2020 and the level crossing will be removed in 2022.

For information on other designs that were assessed as not feasible, please view the Cherry Street Technical Brochure here.

The Cherry Street level crossing is located east of Werribee Station, and is used by 20,000 vehicles daily. This is a key connection point for the area, linking residents with the local city centre and Princes Freeway. Up to 140 trains travel through the Cherry Street level crossing each weekday.

Removing this crossing will improve safety, provide more reliable travel times and reduce congestion. It will ease travel and improve safety when getting around Melbourne’s west.

The final design

The level crossing will be removed by building a road bridge over the rail line, extending Tarneit Road to Princes Highway via the irrigation channel next to Wyndham City Council offices.

People travelling to and from Princes Freeway will have a faster journey using this new direct link.

At Cherry Street, we will build a wide, well-lit underpass for pedestrians and cyclists to safely cross the rail line and gain easy access to the Watton Street shopping precinct, before closing the existing crossing to road traffic.

Works are expected to start in early 2020 and the level crossing will be removed in 2022.

For information on other designs that were assessed as not feasible, please view the Cherry Street Technical Brochure here.

Q&A

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  • How many lanes will be on the 'preferred options' bridge that goes over the railway? What is the expected impact on Wattle Avenue with the 'preferred design' is it not likely that all traffic north of the railway line will now use Wattle Ave / Edwards road to access the Princess Freeway? The preferred option is a very poor one, this will severely limit traffic flow and re-direct traffic into small backstreets. The longer view needs to be taken here to not only remove road level crossings but actually improve the Werribee area, it may take longer to deliver other options, but it is much more important to deliver the right solution, not the hastiest.

    TheJacksonian asked 27 days ago

    Hi TheJacksonian, thanks for your question. The bridge will have two lanes in each direction and the signalised intersection at Wattle Avenue will have two right turn lanes onto Princes Highway and one left/through lane. The capacity for cars turning right will be greater than going through Wattle Avenue, making a right turn the preferred option to access Princes Freeway. The design is the best solution for the area, taking into account the constraints with the site and the future plans for the Werribee line. If you’d like more information or to speak to a member of the team, please phone 1800 105 105 or email us at contact@levelcrossings.vic.gov.au

  • What will be the connection from Market Road to the Watton Street Strip shopping area? It seems that this connection (my most often used) will be lost or made more difficult

    frmie asked 20 days ago

    Hi there, thanks for getting in touch. 

    To get to the Watton Street shops from Market Road, your journey will be a bit different. Instead of driving through Cherry Street, you'll travel from Market Road along Railway Avenue to the new road bridge, which connects to Princes Highway. You'll turn right at Princes Highway, then right again at Cherry Street to access Watton Street. 

    According to our traffic modelling, this trip will be about one kilometre longer but will be more reliable and consistent, without the risk of being caught at the boom gates.

  • Why do you identify in the "What you told us" section of the November 2019 newsletter that more car parks was important, and then not mention car parking at all in the rest of the newsletter? The current car parks are full before 7.00am most weekdays. Numerous people park along the rail reserve beside Bunnings, as well as in nearby residential sheets. Why not formalise this parking area beside Bunnings? Why not extend the parking area behind the gymnasium into the space where the roundabout was? That will be valued more by station users, and by nearby residents that put up with overflow parking spilling into their streets, than expanses of grass that will be rarely used and poorly maintained. More car parking is far more important than choosing paint colours - what a token gesture to engage with the community! The same opportunity has been missed at the Aviation Road crossing - a chaotic (and sometimes confrontational) parking situation has not been addressed at all by the works. I also question why the pedestrian underpass is orientated on a SW to NE diagonal? Surely a perpendicular crossing offers better sightlines from the approach roads to provide a greater opportunity for passive surveillance. This would also provide a more direct connection to the station precinct. A pedestrian path from the underpass, between the rail reserve and the train driver car park, Would be beneficial, otherwise pedestrians will filter through the car park to access the station.

    David W asked 23 days ago

    Hi David, thanks for your questions.

    The area behind Bunnings is VicTrack land, which is used as an informal car park. While the project is not required to offset informal car parking, we're investigating opportunities to create new car parking in the area. Also, the Werribee line is set to benefit from new or upgraded car parks, as part of the Victorian Government's $150 million Car Parks for Commuters Fund. 

    At Cherry Street, there are critical underground services under the road. To avoid disrupting these services, the underpass needs to be orientated on a south-west to north-east angle. 

    We have also designed the underpass to accommodate for future plans in the area, including possible additional rail lines. The underpass will be wide and well-lit, with clear lines of sight from one end to another.

  • Why are they removing the much needed overflow parking, and it not being replaced. The main parking for the station is full by 7am most week days... Which then people move to the overflow parking alongside Bunnings. I feel this is more of importance rather than the colour of the paintwork. What is the council / government going to do to ensure the local residents can park effectively to use the trains into the city?

    Dan Woodmason asked 23 days ago

    Hi Dan, thanks for your feedback.

    The area behind Bunnings is VicTrack land which is used as an informal car park. We're not required to offset informal car parking as part of the project, however opportunities to create new car parking in the area are being investigated. 

    The Werribee line is set to benefit from new or upgraded car parks, as part of the Victorian Government’s $150 million Car Parks for Commuters Fund. You can read more about the fund here: https://www.danandrews.com.au/more-parking-for-commuters

  • There is a car park available behind Bunnings located at Cherry street. The one which has rocks & gravel laid out. Are there any upgrades planned for this car park? Will it be available for commuters after level crossing removal? If it is going to be removed, are there any plans for new parking spaces to be created?

    DT27 asked 24 days ago

    Hi there, thank you for your question. 

    The area behind Bunnings is VicTrack land which is used as an informal car park. The project is not required to offset informal car parking, however opportunities to create new car parking in the area are being investigated. 

    The Werribee line is set to benefit from new or upgraded car parks, as part of the Victorian Government’s $150 million Car Parks for Commuters Fund. You can read more about the fund here: https://www.danandrews.com.au/more-parking-for-commuters

  • Ison Road and the connection to the Freeway must be completed prior to any changes or constrictions to the current crossing. The entire Wyndham Vale/Manor Vale area have no alternative access to Werribee, and only and limited access to Hoppers Crossing via Shaws Rd. The Werribee St Crossing and Cherry St crossing along with adjacent roads are critical at present for anyone leaving the existing Wyndham Vale/Manor Vale area, and even a minor disruption for short periods can effectively stop traffic movement to and from this suburban area. Any traffic needing to access either the freeway, or Werribee itself, along with nearby services must travel towards Werribee to exit the suburbs, anyone that needs to travel to the East of the Werribee River is also currently forced into the same area. Prior to 2001, none of this was required, but since then, a large population has developed in Wyndham Vale/Manor Vale and now must use the same infrastructure as was previously used by only a handful of local. Completing Ison Rd will likely reduce traffic in these critical points by 30-50% during any construction period, which in turn will lessen potential accident and injuries to both motorists and also anyone working on the Level crossing sites. The current volumes of traffic are near to or even exceeding the current capacity at peak times of the day, and any form of interruption to the status quo must first be to reduce traffic demands before beginning removal project. We live to the east of the Werribee River, but our school zoning put our Children in Manor Vale Primary, about 500 meters from our home, but a 2 km drive due to needing to cross the river at either Cotterall St or Shaws Rd, it is clear that a large number of people spend considerable time stuck in traffic around these two points, and back on to Ballan Rd as a result. It would probably be Prudent to also connect Wollahra Rise and Sewells Rd in a similar time frame to further alleviate traffic volumes via the two choke points. There is little point in trying to delay or stagger the removal of either Werribee St or Cherry St, as the close proximity of the two crossings means any traffic delays at one quickly overflows to the other. So the only option to to remove a significant proportion of the traffic by providing a viable alternative route out and away from the existing crossings.

    mackkiwi asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback. 

    The 75 level crossings to be removed as a Victorian Government commitment have been selected based on a range of criteria including safety, congestion and the improvement of the wider road and rail networks. The Cherry Street and Werribee Street level crossings have been identified as some of the 75 dangerous level crossings to be removed. 

    Currently, wider network road solutions for Ison Road are not within the scope of our project. Your suggestions have been forwarded through to the design and traffic teams, and their feasibility to be performed within the scope of our project will be considered.

  • Can you also study at alternative of putting 3 rail tunnels through from around Forsythe Rd to Werribee West, this will remove the need for all 3 level crossings putting passenger platforms underground, and retaining safety from opportunistic crime of passive surveillance of pedestrians using the retained roadways, by motorists. With value capture considered from sale of railway land for redevelopment this is preferred option financially (see analysis submitted under separate cover)

    A.I.R. Vic asked 5 months ago

    Hi there,

    The proposed designs for all three sites were developed using several key criteria. Environmental, technical and community considerations all contributed to the designs. 

    Our key impact assessment includes property acquisition, impact to retail and activity centre, compliance with design standards, impact to the critical oil pipeline and other utilities, construction impacts and future proofing. 

    Designs that involve moving the rail under each level crossing site have been ruled out due to several factors, including the major oil pipeline that runs alongside the Werribee line. Moving this to make way for a tunnel would delay construction by up to 2 years. Rail under would also not allow for potential additional train tracks, and would likely involve property acquisition and significant disruptions to passenger and commercial trains running along the Werribee line. 

    Recent and future community consultation focus on refining plans for open community space, which aim to create inviting pedestrian and cyclist-friendly spaces and in turn retaining passive surveillance. The "Selecting the best design" documents for each project provide more information on how we assess and decide which designs are feasible.

  • The preferred option with the Werribee Street Crossing is elevation. The Cherry Street Crossing should also be elevated, to link to the Werribee Street project. The start of the Cherry Street elevation should be soon after leaving Derrimut Road underpass westbound. This would avoid the obvious detrimental effect of losing the Cherry Street Crossing to the Watton Street retail strip. Arguments with respect to the heritage listing of the Werribee Railway Station are about the building, not the platforms. As such, the station building could be incorporated into a new station, just as the Shot Tower was incorporated into Melbourne Central. Lifting the rail will alleviate the current damaging vibrations to the building in its current format.

    AST asked 5 months ago

    At Werribee Street, there is enough space within the rail corridor for an elevated rail design to be built, with minimal road and rail disruptions. 

    For Cherry Street, this same space is not available. Building an elevated rail structure will also result in significant rail disruptions. 

    Currently, upgrades to Werribee Station are not within the project scope. Future upgrades may be considered by Public Transport Victoria.